Proximity Cards

HID Prox FOBs

prox-fobThe ProxKey III is a proximity card keyfob for access control offering HID proximity technology in a convenient, pocket size device. The proximity card keyfob easily attaches to a key ring, badge clip or lanyard. The ProxKey III is built to withstand harsh operating environments or handling.

The ProxKey III is suited for use in access control applications where a Photo ID is not required.

Key Features of the ProxKey III:

  • Small enough to fit on a key ring.
  • Universal compatibility with HID proximity card readers.
  • Provides an external number for easy identification and control Can be
    placed on a key ring for convenient entry.
  • Supports formats up to 85 bits, with over 137 billion codes.
  • Using HID’s ProxProgrammer®, card vendors can ship proximity keyfobs, custom programmed to
    their customers’ requirements, from their own inventory. Enables smaller order
    quantities and overnight delivery. (Check with vendor for availability.)
  • Lifetime warranty.

HID Indala Prox cards

indala_flexiso_xtHID Indala Prox cards

Combine the benefits of proven Indala® Proximity and HID FlexSmart® MIFARE contactless smart card technology in one smart card. The contactless smart card with proximity technology can be used for diverse applications such as access control, cashless vending, public transportation, event ticketing, customer loyalty and photo ID cards. Featuring exclusive FlexSecur® security technology, the card provides an added level of access system security through a verification process at the smart card reader. Unique to the HID Indala product line, FlexSecur screens out unauthorized smart cards prior to sending card data to the host system.

Manufactured to the highest quality standards, Indala Proximity cards and MIFARE smart cards have the memory structure and capacity to store multiple applications on a single credential. The data is protected with encryption keys used in the mutual authentication process. Therefore, no important data will be shared until the smart card and reader have been authenticated to each other.

When security and performance count most, HID’s FlexSmart MIFARE smart cards can be produced with visual security and anti-counterfeiting features such as holograms, ultraviolet fluorescent inks, micro-printing or a custom logo to quickly and easily identify genuine cards.

Key Features of the FPMXI FlexPass MIFARE/Indala Combo Smart Card

  • Multiple Formats – Supports all Indala proximity card formats, including FlexEnterprise®.
  • Transition Solution – Add smart card applications to an existing Indala proximity technology access control system.
  • High Security – Mutual authentication, data encryption and unique 32-bit serial number.
  • Proven, Reliable Technology – Offers extremely consistent read range. Unaffected by body shielding or variable environmental conditions, even when close to keys and coins.
  • Multiple Memory Types – Available in MIFARE 1K and 4K.
  • True Credit Card Thickness – Use with all direct image and thermal transfer printers.

Questions? Contact ASAP Identification Security @ 317-488-1030 or info@asapident.com!

What level of card security do I need?

How secure do you need your ID cards?

This is a common question from our customers. The level of card security depends on a number of factors but we will try to break it down in basic bullet list:

PVC printed ID card

  • If visual identification is all you require, then a simple photo ID may work just fine. This is a simple, low cost solution and it can be implemented quickly and easily.
  • For this ID, you can simply include you company logo and employee name OR you can considering adding photo, title or access level.
    1. Benefits: low cost, professional and easy entry-level ID solution
    2. Risks: this does not automate access control (i.e. turn card “off” once no longer at company) and some interaction may be required to validate a user.
  • If this security solution will meet your needs, please contact ASAP for information on an ID printer OR for ASAP to print cards on your behalf.

Mag stripe or bar code printed ID card

  • If your organization requires a slightly higher level of security than a simple visual ID, consider a magnetic stripe or bar code solution. This is also a low cost and easy solution to implement that may meet your needs.
  • How can a mag stripe or bar code system work? It may be used for clocking in/out, logging into a POS system, checking books in/out as well as paying for meals on an account simply by swiping the card through a mag stripe or bar code reader connected to your company system.
  • Bar codes can be 1D, 2D or QR codes depending on the amount of data to be stored. Mag strips are low, mid or high-co and again can store a variety of data on 1, 2 or 3 “tracks”.
  • Benefits and Risks are the same as PVC only ID cards. It adds a slightly higher level of function but very little added security.

Proximity ID card

  • Proximity cards/fobs are considered “keyless access”. They offer facilities an easier and more affordable way to control access by issuing Prox “keys” which they can simple “turn off” once the person no longer requires access without having to track down a physical key. Prox also allows tracking of access when readers are required for access control (buildings, parking lots, etc). This would be considered a “moderate” security solution.
  • Users are also able to control access on schedules and/or grant access to certain areas only to certain employees.
  • Finally, you are able to print on most Prox cards to allow you to include both visual security with electronic access control.

Smart (contact and contactless) ID card

  • The highest level of card security are consider Smart Cards.
    • Contactless smart cards use high-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) and a memory chip to store data (2K, 8K, 16K, etc). The larger the chip, the more capacity to store/encrypt. These cards can be used for building/parking access, secured access to rooms, cabinets, closets, logical access, inventory tracking, cashless vending, clocking in/out.
    • There are risks….primarily privacy concerns since devices store data and can be read by another device if in the wrong hands.
  • Contact smart cards include a chip/microprocessor on the card with enormous storage capacity. These cards must be inserted into a special reader to access data but these are more secure cards and cannot be skimmed (no RFID). Consider the new chip credit cards as an example of contact cards are work. These, too, can have a photo/name added to include visual security if needed.

Allegion offers two new credentials

Allegion offers two new credentials

Allegion has two new credential options designed to make life more convenient

  • Thin keyfob: Offered with either MIFARE Classic smart or proximity technology, the new, thinner keyfob provides the same level of security and convenience as our standard keyfobs, but its thinner profile takes up less space on a key ring.
  • Silicone wristband: The new MIFARE Classic smart silicone wristband credential offers convenience and secure access with a wearable credential. Made of waterproof silicone for durability, the wristband is available in 11 colors.

More Information

iCLASS® Seos®

Standard-based high frequency contactless smart card for strong authentication and data confidentiality. Multi-application access control solution that supports the storage of multiple SIOs.
Multi-application enterprise-ready, converged contactless card for securing physical access and access to IT resources that also supports migration from proximity technology
For environments where multiple legacy reader technologies are in place and and upgrade to advanced, more secure technology is desired.

Proprietary vs. open: Which is more secure?

allegion

The Internet of Things (IoT) movement is gaining speed at rapid rates. As a result, there has been a lot of discussion about security. Is a proprietary system or an open one more equipped to protect a company and its assets?

Proprietary system manufacturers claim their systems are more secure. After all, they have more control because their systems are closed, right?  Wrong.

“It’s a fallacy to believe that because something is proprietary it is more secure,” says Allegion Futurist Rob Martens. “Proprietary systems are not more secure than open systems—in fact, I’d argue that, in many cases, they are less secure.”

Martens lists 6 reasons why open source systems are more secure:

1) Complexity doesn’t equal greater security.
“If a system is difficult to navigate—which is often the case with proprietary ones—that doesn’t translate into it being more secure, especially to a hacker,” Martens says.

2) 100% security is a myth.
“Nothing is 100% secure. If a provider is telling you their system is fool-proof, then you should be wary,” he explains. “There are holes in both proprietary and open systems. It’s the job of the integrator and the supporting IT team to plug those holes.”

3) “Security through obscurity” is not real security.
Proprietary systems rely on security through obscurity—that is, the use of secrecy in the design or implementation. Its owners or designers believe that because the system’s flaws are not known, then attackers are unlikely to find them. And that’s simply not true.  “I liken that to thinking that just keeping quiet about your possessions means you won’t get robbed,” Martens says. “Keeping the source code closed might deter some hackers, but just look at the large number of successful attacks against Windows and other proprietary software. Those prove that closed systems are just as vulnerable.”

4) There is strength in numbers.
Everyone has access to the open system’s source code, which means bugs and vulnerabilities are found and fixed more quickly—closing up security holes faster. “The continuous and broad peer review, combined with publicly available source code, only improves security. Threats, defects and risks that may otherwise be missed are more apt to be identified and eliminated,” he says. “With open systems, there are literally thousands and thousands of teams working to enhance the security of the system.”

5) The collective effort leads to greater reliability.
Open source is peer-reviewed software, which leads to more reliability. The infrastructure  of the Internet is largely composed of open-source programs that have proven to be both reliable and robust.

6) Only open systems can truly be audited.
Finally, with proprietary systems, you have nothing but the vendor telling you that the system is secure and adhering to standards. “With open systems, the visibility of the code—and the hundreds of thousands of eyes on it—means you can see for yourself and be confident,” Martens says. While proprietary systems offer some benefits, Martens believes  that, in the end, they actually stymie growth and constrain an organization. Open platforms, on the other hand, provide the security, as well as the ease and functionality,  that is a must for many businesses.  “My experience has shown me that open systems are the best option for companies. While there are security concerns—because nothing is 100 percent secure—the collective efforts help integrators and companies manage risk and, therefore, offer greater security.”

Understanding smart cards

Understanding smart cards – Smart cards undoubtedly provide numerous benefits over traditional mag strip and prox cards. But getting understanding the benefits can be a challenge. Allegion has a ready-to-go presentation to help your customers understand the technology and to answer their questions and concerns about smart cards. Learn More

News from Allegion: Smart Cards Offer Many Advantages

Screen shot 2014-09-23 at 10.39.54 AMSmart cards offer many advantages over proximity cards

Proximity readers and cards have been on the market for over 25 years. As the first contactless card that can be “read” without inserting or creating contact with a reader, proximity cards advanced credentials forward significantly.

However, proximity cards are not without their limitations. Namely, storage and security. The storage on proximity cards is limited to the card number alone—making it functional for only one purpose. Additionally, proximity technology is highly susceptible to counterfeits and duplication.

Smart card technology solves both issues.

  • Storage: There are multiple sectors on a smart card, allowing for storage of several different types of applications, including access control, POS, computer access, data storage and cashless vending. Smart cards can be used for multiple purposes and are 100 times faster than proximity credentials.
  • Security: With advanced data encryption, duplication is nearly impossible. As an added level of security, smart technology requires mutual authentication—between the card and reader.

Making the transition
It’s fairly simple to transition to smart cards on existing systems. Allegion’s aptiQ™ Multi-Technology Readers allow companies to move at their own pace because they read both 125 kHz proximity and 13.56 MHz contactless smart cards in a single unit. Even more, Allegion’s aptiQ readers are very easy to install or replace with a quick-connect design that uses standard wiring.

Read more industry insights regarding sorting through credential technology choices by Allegion.

Want more information on Allegion’s aptiQ smart card technology? Contact Sheila Brown today!

New Proximity Card Offering

Are you looking for another option for your proximity cards?

Now, you have one – XceedID.

XceedID is now offering a 35-bit, 125 kHz proximity card that is completely compatible with HID readers. In addition, it complies with the format of existing Corporate 1000 accounts. That means, Corporate 1000 customers can take advantage of the highly durable XceedID proximity cards with the confidence that XceedID will maintain a duplicate-free, fully tracked set of card numbers.

If you would like to learn more about this exciting new proximity card offering from XceedID, please give us a call at (317) 488-1030.

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